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penguinteen:

thepopularbook:

Maya Van Wagenen on the TODAY Show!

Dear world, meet Maya Van Wagenen, the poised, smart, lovely author of Popular: Vintage Wisdom for a Modern Geek.

(Source: visualpantheon, via wasarahbi)

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‘Paper Towns’ and Everyday YA: Please adapt these teen tales into films too! | EW.com

I like the way EW thinks.

Paper Towns and Looking for Alaska Challenged

fishingboatproceeds:

Earlier today I received an email from a high school English teacher in Strasburg, Colorado who plans to teach an elective Young Adult literature course. A group of parents created a petition to “cleanse” the book list, claiming that the majority of the books on the curriculum, “are profane, pornographic, violent, criminal, crass, crude, vile, and will result in the irreparable erosion of my students’ moral character.”

Paper Towns and Looking for Alaska have been targeted in particular, and the press attended the most recent school board meeting. The motion has been tabled for the next meeting at 7:00 pm on April 9th at Strasburg High School: 56729 e. Colorado Ave, Strasburg, CO 80136.

Please join me in emailing letters of support of the teacher at Strasburg who has heroically stood by her curriculum and stood alone at School Board meetings defending the books. It’s important to keep your letter as civil as possible, even if this kind of thing turns you into a giant squid of anger.

Letters should be addressed "To the School Board" and emailed to StrasburgYALiteratureCourse@gmail.com. It would also be a great help to attend the next School Board meeting if you live in the area.

I am extremely grateful to those who have come out in support of my books on the various occasions they have been challenged, who understand that I am not out to corrupt teenagers, and who further understand the importance of reading books critically and thoughtfully as a whole, rather than focusing on individual scenes ripped from their context. Thanks for supporting my books, and thanks for being awesome.

Full proposed curriculum below the jump.

Read More

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This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things

Edited on March 7 to add: I clearly missed that specific things were said, and that is not okay. Authors—all authors—are very much human and deserving of our respect and kindness. My apologies.

But I very much believe in the spirit of my original post … we’re in this together. We’re all people, real people, and collaborators. No matter what side of the desk you sit on. 

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In publishing-universe news, yesterday the Life in Publishing tumblr was shut down permanently, and the account deleted.

This anonymous blog by a (presumably female) publishing insider typically featured cheeky observations about the publishing world (including, yes, author behavior). Based on content, I’d always assumed its mastermind worked in children’s/young adult publishing.

The end came when an author successfully identified the person behind the blog and emailed—to her work address—an angry J’Accuse-letter threatening to reveal her to the public and to her employers. Among the things the accuser found condemnable: jokes about summer Fridays and gentle ribbing about blog tours. You know, really terrible stuff that no one should ever be forced to endure in gif form.

I got to read Life in Publishing’s final post—including the author’s letter to her—in the brief time it was still live. One of the comments, including many from supportive authors said, “this is why we can’t have nice things.”

This makes me super annoyed, but mostly it makes me sad. Life in Publishing’s posts had become infrequent, but when the blog was really active it was FUNNY. And pretty insightful. And, truly, quite gentle. We all know what mean gossip looks like, and this was not it.

We all—editors, authors, agents, publicists, marketers, salespeople, designers, etc.—work really, really hard. We work in a business that runs on talent and passion and sometimes very intense emotion. If you can’t have a sense of humor about all of this, well, you’re in for a pretty miserable ride.

There is no us/them. The greatest successes I have experienced are forged through collaboration, imbued with understanding, and maintain A SENSE OF HUMOR.

I’ll miss you Life in Publishing – whoever you were.

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wasarahbi:

So my roommate is back on the tfios beat. She’s baaaaack

(and of course when I said “deserve the special edition” I don’t mean to say that nobody can have it, it was me asking for clarification, etc etc)

I officially deem her deserving of the chance to buy a second book.

wasarahbi:

So my roommate is back on the tfios beat. She’s baaaaack

(and of course when I said “deserve the special edition” I don’t mean to say that nobody can have it, it was me asking for clarification, etc etc)

I officially deem her deserving of the chance to buy a second book.

hermionejg has all the avocado porn all the time

hermionejg has all the avocado porn all the time

(Source: wanna-be-skinny, via hermionejg)

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bookavore:

Yesterday I read Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith and was pretty blown away. There are a couple reasons, but primarily, it’s a fabulous book because it’s clear that Smith wrote this book for nobody. Or maybe, just for himself. This is a nice surprise in YA, where the target market of a book is often clear from the jacket copy. (Side note: is this book YA? I actually am not sure that it is. But let’s table that for now. It’s been published as YA, so I’ll judge it against other YA books.) Because the book feels like it’s for nobody, when it ended up feeling like it was just for me, only for me, it was a lovely surprise. 
There are two other things I love about this book. The first is that it’s the first book I’ve read in a long time featuring a really confused and probably bi teen. As a former really confused and probably bi teen, I was overjoyed to see myself in a book for once. I wish there had been books like this when I was a teen. A selfish reason to love a book, I guess, but aren’t all reasons to love a book ultimately selfish? Smith does an incredible job of portraying how thin the line can be between loving a friend and having a crush, and how unsettling and mutable that can be for both (or, in this case, all three) people involved.
The second is that it’s successful on multiple levels. A lot of YA right now has a great hook but puts all its weight on that hook (alternately, a lot of YA has a great character but puts all its weight on that character, a burden that no teen, no matter how fictional, can hold), and when that fails, the book fails with it. This book is a good LGBTQ novel, a good dystopia, a good contemporary realistic up until the point it becomes a dystopia, a good small-town novel, a good love story. It’s a much more complete reading experience. Each piece holds the other pieces together accordingly. It’s a great book for fans of Frank Portman, John Barnes, and E. Lockhart—and it’s also a great book for thinking about what YA is, and what it could be.

bookavore:

Yesterday I read Grasshopper Jungle by Andrew Smith and was pretty blown away. There are a couple reasons, but primarily, it’s a fabulous book because it’s clear that Smith wrote this book for nobody. Or maybe, just for himself. This is a nice surprise in YA, where the target market of a book is often clear from the jacket copy. (Side note: is this book YA? I actually am not sure that it is. But let’s table that for now. It’s been published as YA, so I’ll judge it against other YA books.) Because the book feels like it’s for nobody, when it ended up feeling like it was just for me, only for me, it was a lovely surprise. 

There are two other things I love about this book. The first is that it’s the first book I’ve read in a long time featuring a really confused and probably bi teen. As a former really confused and probably bi teen, I was overjoyed to see myself in a book for once. I wish there had been books like this when I was a teen. A selfish reason to love a book, I guess, but aren’t all reasons to love a book ultimately selfish? Smith does an incredible job of portraying how thin the line can be between loving a friend and having a crush, and how unsettling and mutable that can be for both (or, in this case, all three) people involved.

The second is that it’s successful on multiple levels. A lot of YA right now has a great hook but puts all its weight on that hook (alternately, a lot of YA has a great character but puts all its weight on that character, a burden that no teen, no matter how fictional, can hold), and when that fails, the book fails with it. This book is a good LGBTQ novel, a good dystopia, a good contemporary realistic up until the point it becomes a dystopia, a good small-town novel, a good love story. It’s a much more complete reading experience. Each piece holds the other pieces together accordingly. It’s a great book for fans of Frank Portman, John Barnes, and E. Lockhart—and it’s also a great book for thinking about what YA is, and what it could be.

tswgobook:

Valentine’s Day is all about the romance, but love should be celebrated all year round! Submit a message of love to our inbox and we will post it here!

tswgobook:

Valentine’s Day is all about the romance, but love should be celebrated all year round! Submit a message of love to our inbox and we will post it here!