Latest Tweets:

Some very big news about a very Tiny superstar. Thrilled to be back in the Tiny Cooper business with David Levithan! Read the news in EW, here.

Some very big news about a very Tiny superstar. Thrilled to be back in the Tiny Cooper business with David Levithan! Read the news in EW, here.

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penguinteen:

The relationship between an author and his/her editor is special and unique, so we thought you guys might like to know more about it! This Thursday, 7/17, we are hosting a #PenguinTeenChat with Kat Rosenfield (Amelia Anne is Dead and Gone, Inland), Nina LaCour (Hold Still, The DIsenchantments, Everything Leads to You), and their fabulous editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel. Join us on Twitter to ask these ladies questions about everything from their books to writing advice to how editors and writers work together. If you ask a question using #PenguinTeenChat, you’ll be entered to win a full set of Kat and Nina’s books! Will we see you there?

penguinteen:

The relationship between an author and his/her editor is special and unique, so we thought you guys might like to know more about it! This Thursday, 7/17, we are hosting a #PenguinTeenChat with Kat Rosenfield (Amelia Anne is Dead and Gone, Inland), Nina LaCour (Hold Still, The DIsenchantments, Everything Leads to You), and their fabulous editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel. Join us on Twitter to ask these ladies questions about everything from their books to writing advice to how editors and writers work together. If you ask a question using #PenguinTeenChat, you’ll be entered to win a full set of Kat and Nina’s books! Will we see you there?

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JSG's tumblr

Anonymous said: What's the name of your son? Is it Will (like Will Grayson)?

No, sorry.

It’s John Penguin Levithan Green Grayson III.

But I usually just call him Tiny.

fishingboatproceeds:

Walter Dean Myers died yesterday at the age of 76.
I suspect that every YA writer has a Walter Dean Myers story, but here’s mine: In 2006 or 2007, I spent a long plane ride in the cramped back row of an airplane, situated between my editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel, and Walter Dean Myers.
He hadn’t read my books and didn’t know me, but when I finally got up the nerve to introduce myself a couple hours into the flight, he was astonishingly gracious. He shared advice about writing and publishing and stories over the decades. In my many interactions with him since, he was always so kind and gracious to me. He invented so much of contemporary YA lit, but he was always quick to credit and congratulate others.
He will be remembered not just for his brilliant books (he wrote more than 100 of them!) but for his tireless advocacy: He was the National Ambassador for Children’s Literacy until just a few months ago, and in March wrote this brilliant essay about the lack of diversity in children’s books.
Like many young people of my generation, I read Myers’ war novel Fallen Angels in my adolescence—it was, in fact, probably the first YA novel I read (although at the time I didn’t know about book categories; I just thought it was good). A veteran who enlisted in the army at 17, Myers was a brilliant war novelist (Sunrise over Fallujah is also excellent), but he could write about anything: He won the first-ever Printz Award for the brilliant and deeply troubling Monster, about a murder trial, and he won the Coretta Scott King Award an astonishing six times.
It’s hard to imagine YA literature without him.

I think that flight was after TLA in April 2007, flying home from San Antonio to NY. I remember we had been disappointed, because we hadn’t had a chance to see/hear/meet Walter Dean Myers during the conference itself. To find ourselves seated next to him was thrilling (and terrifying). 
John has summed it up perfectly. We work in a field of smart, supportive people, but I have rarely seen such pure generosity, and intelligence. What a gift that trip was. 
Such a loss.

fishingboatproceeds:

Walter Dean Myers died yesterday at the age of 76.

I suspect that every YA writer has a Walter Dean Myers story, but here’s mine: In 2006 or 2007, I spent a long plane ride in the cramped back row of an airplane, situated between my editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel, and Walter Dean Myers.

He hadn’t read my books and didn’t know me, but when I finally got up the nerve to introduce myself a couple hours into the flight, he was astonishingly gracious. He shared advice about writing and publishing and stories over the decades. In my many interactions with him since, he was always so kind and gracious to me. He invented so much of contemporary YA lit, but he was always quick to credit and congratulate others.

He will be remembered not just for his brilliant books (he wrote more than 100 of them!) but for his tireless advocacy: He was the National Ambassador for Children’s Literacy until just a few months ago, and in March wrote this brilliant essay about the lack of diversity in children’s books.

Like many young people of my generation, I read Myers’ war novel Fallen Angels in my adolescence—it was, in fact, probably the first YA novel I read (although at the time I didn’t know about book categories; I just thought it was good). A veteran who enlisted in the army at 17, Myers was a brilliant war novelist (Sunrise over Fallujah is also excellent), but he could write about anything: He won the first-ever Printz Award for the brilliant and deeply troubling Monster, about a murder trial, and he won the Coretta Scott King Award an astonishing six times.

It’s hard to imagine YA literature without him.

I think that flight was after TLA in April 2007, flying home from San Antonio to NY. I remember we had been disappointed, because we hadn’t had a chance to see/hear/meet Walter Dean Myers during the conference itself. To find ourselves seated next to him was thrilling (and terrifying). 

John has summed it up perfectly. We work in a field of smart, supportive people, but I have rarely seen such pure generosity, and intelligence. What a gift that trip was. 

Such a loss.

Have I mentioned that there’s now a way to insert yourself (or, really, anything you want) into the INLAND book jacket? Full tumblr, gallery of images, and more about the book can be found here.

penguinteen:

A quote so nice, we’re posting it twice. Enjoy the full interview with John Green here. 

penguinteen:

A quote so nice, we’re posting it twice. Enjoy the full interview with John Green here

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hermionejg:

Just your average hotel room office.

I see nothing unusual.

hermionejg:

Just your average hotel room office.

I see nothing unusual.

Publisher’s Weekly Profile

For those interested in editing (and more specifically in my background), the kind folks at Publishers Weekly have posted this profile. Now with a partial title list*, for the curious.

*The titles included are just some of the books I have published in my career, with an emphasis on recent history and those similar to my current acquisitions (YA-centric, etc.)

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Asks -and- How to Become and Editor -and- Submissions

Thanks for all the great messages recently. A reminder that (for business-type questions) I cannot reply directly to anonymous asks (they have to be posted for all).

I’m excited to see that the most frequent question continues to be about how to become an editor. Here’s a link to a semi-recent post that answers some of those questions. Older ones here and here and here (about breaking in) and here (about the hard parts of my job) and here (about why publishing takes so long) Hope that helps. And please keep asking questions!

About submissions … I don’t edit picture books anymore. Most of my list is YA (including a lot of older YA) and some middle grade (always looking) with a bit of YA memoir. I almost always get subs through agents.

Related, I’ve had a few questions about books I’ve edited. Working on an updated list to share.

hermionejg:

hahahahahahahaha life is weird.


Weird indeed.

hermionejg:

hahahahahahahaha life is weird.

Weird indeed.

(via fishingboatproceeds)